Mercedes-AMG GT R Roadster Goes Official With Active Aero, 197 MPH Top Speed



The Mercedes-AMG GT lineup is expanding as the automaker has introduced the new GT R Roadster.

Essentially drop top version of the range-topping coupe, the GT R Roadster has a triple-layer fabric soft top with a lightweight structure constructed out of aluminum, magnesium and steel. The model also has gloss black mirror caps, yellow brake calipers and 19- / 20-inch forged wheels.

Moving into the cabin, drivers are greeted by a familiar cockpit that has a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster, a 10.25-inch infotainment system and black carbon fiber / piano lacquer trim. The model also comes equipped with black Nappa leather AMG Performance seats and an individually numbered badge on the center console. A number of different options will be available including heated / cooled seats and the AirScarf neck-level heating system.

Like the standard GT R, the roadster is powered by a twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 engine that produces 577 hp (430 kW/ 585 PS) and 516 lb-ft (700 Nm) of torque. It is connected to a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission which enables the car to accelerate from 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h) in 3.6 seconds before hitting a top speed of 197 mph (317 km/h).

While most convertibles are focused on cruising, the GT R Roadster is pretty hardcore. Among the standard features are dynamic engine and transmission mounts, a titanium exhaust and a carbon fiber torque tube. The model also has a track-focused suspension, active rear-wheel steering and an electronically controlled limited slip rear differential.

If that wasn’t impressive enough, the GT R Roadster has active aerodynamics. The system works by extending a carbon fiber element downward by approximately 1.6 inches (40mm) to create a Venturi effect which “sucks the car onto the road.” It also reduces front-axle lift by roughly 88.1 lbs (40 kg) at 155 mph (250 km/h).

Production will be limited to 750 units globally, but there’s no word on pricing quite yet.

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