Man Goes To Pick Up Car From Dealership, Only To Find It Missing



Getting your car fixed at a dealership is normally a pretty simple and straightforward process, but that’s certainly not the case with Scott Robbins’ 2004 Chrysler Sebring convertible.

According to Florida’s WPLG Local 10, Robbins had the car towed to Massey Yardley Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram and paid them over $1,700 (£1,314 / €1,501) to fix the vehicle because it was stuck in gear. This is where things get a bit unusual as Robbins lives in Massachusetts and told the dealership he’d pick up the car in approximately one month.

Even stranger is Robbins’ statement saying he called the dealership before returning to Florida to “make sure my car was there.” While it wouldn’t be unusual to call to ask if the car was fixed, calling to make sure it was still at the dealership seems pretty odd. However, the police report (PDF) says Robbins simply called to inform the dealer he was going to be back in Florida and would pick up the car tomorrow.

Regardless, the dealership told Robbins that his car was no longer there. He told the station the dealership’s service manager, Ronald Jellis, originally suggested the city towed it away. Jellis then allegedly said one of Robbins’ friends came and paid for the car before suggesting it was probably stolen.

What happened to the car remains a mystery, but it was equipped with an electronic toll payment system that showed the Sebring was on Florida’s Turnpike the day before Robbins contacted the dealership. This seems to suggest the car was stolen, but nothing is certain as of yet.

Unsurprisingly, Robbins and the dealership aren’t on the best of terms following the incident. Robbins filed a police report and disputed the repair costs with his credit card company. For its part, the dealership contends Robbins has been “abusive” towards them and they’re not even sure the car was stolen.

The dealership is reportedly going to let the insurance company deal with the situation, but Robbins is reportedly considering a lawsuit. Robbins also contends the car is worth $10,000 (£7,727 / €8,830) which seems like a stretch considering Kelly Blue Book estimates a range-topping 2004 Chrysler Sebring Limited Convertible with just 10,000 miles (16,093 km) on the odometer would be worth less than $5,000 (£3,863 / €4,415). The police report does mention “mag wheel rims,” but it’s doubtful they’re worth more than the car.

 



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